EPISODE 69 - PAIN IS CHANGEABLE WITH NEIL PEARSON

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ABOUT THE SHOW

Today on the show I speak with Neil Pearson. Neil is a physical therapist, a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University British Columbia, and a certified yoga therapist - and in this conversation Neil and I take a deep dive into pain science. We discuss how pain is more complex than what we once imagined, how 10 different treatment plans could all positively impact someone's experience of pain, and why yoga is uniquely suited to helping people reduce pain and improve their quality of life. 

ABOUT NEIL PEARSON

Neil Pearson, PT, MSc(RHBS), BA-BPHE, C-IAYT, ERYT500

Neil is a physiotherapist, yoga therapist, Clinical Assistant Professor at University of British Columbia. He is also faculty in four yoga therapy training programs, and developer of the Pain Care Yoga and the Pain Care Aware programs. Neil is a continuing education consultant for family practice doctors and for Canada’s largest private rehabilitation clinic group. He is founding chair of the Physiotherapy Pain Science Division in Canada, and recipient of the Canadian Pain Society's Excellence in Interprofessional Pain Education award. Neil is also an author  - Understand Pain Live Well Again (2008), a chapter about Yoga Therapy in Integrative Pain Management (2016), and most-recently co-author/editor of ‘Yoga and Science in Pain Care: Treating the Person in Pain (2019). 

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PODCAST HIGHLIGHTS

  • Neil’s background in working with people in pain
  • A definition of pain
  • Why pain is more complex than we might think
  • Why pain is a verb, not a noun
  • How yoga philosophy can teach us about pain management
  • What it means to have an integrated view of pain
  • The role that belief plays in reducing pain
  • Why studying poetry can be a great way to learn about pain
  • Centering the voices of people living with pain
  • Practical, concrete tips for teaching students with pain in your group classes
  • Why pain doesn’t necessarily = tissue damage
  • Why the first sign of pain doesn’t indicate damage
  • How pain is passed down through generations (at least in mice)

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